Lessons from YOU ARE A BADASS by Jen Sincero

“How to stop doubting your greatness and start living an awesome life.”

‘You Are a Badass’ promises to help you confront and change your self-sabotaging behaviour and creating a kick-ass life. Its chapters are filled with stories to inspire you and exercises to guide you through your badassery journey. She uses straight talk and humour to help you to get to understand yourself, improve the things that you can and accept those that you can’t change.

Here are some lessons I took away from the book:

  • “What you choose to focus on becomes your reality.”
  • Your faith should be greater than you fear.
  • “Growth ain’t for the weenies, but it is nowhere near as painful as living the life you’re living right now if you’re not really going for it.”
  • If you are able to have a fucked up perception of yourself, you are also able to have a brilliant one. Why choose the former?
  • “When we’re happy and all in love with ourselves, we can’t be bothered with the bullshit (our own or other people’s).”
  • Actions can reveal answers better than just sitting and thinking about them.
  • If you want to make changes in your life and get the things that you want, you’re going to have to take control of your thoughts.
  • When you live in a state of gratitude, it’s easy to believe that more great things are coming your way.
  • “So often when we say we’re unqualified for something, what we are really saying is that we’re too scared to try it, not that we can’t do it.”
  • “There is a big difference between walking around saying you want to make a million dollars a year, and having crystal clear intentions, fierce desire, and hell-bent action towards a specific goal.”

This book is a good reminder to us about our abilities to steer our lives in the direction we desire. If you usually have self-doubt, feel stuck or unable to see yourself in a place of success, wealth, happiness or thriving in whatever it is you want to do and have, it gives you a pinch to tell you to stop and tells you how to change and do better.

⭐⭐⭐⭐


Title: You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living And Awesome Life

Author: Jen Sincero

Published: 2013, Running Press Book Publishers

Genre: Self-help

Book Review: The $100 Startup by Chris Guillebeau

“Fire Your Boss, Do What You Love And Work Better To Live More.”

Depending on where you are in your life and career, this book could be positive and inspiring or it could be insufferably ambitious. I found it to be a brew of both. Here’s how.

In a world where we are constantly discouraged by the arduous, harsh and dark journey starting and running a business is, it’s pleasant to read a book that simplifies it and makes it look achievable. The $100 Startup shows how you need three important ingredients to start – a service or product, willing payers and a way to get paid for it. It talks about how you don’t need a lot of money or exceptional training to start a business. Guillebeau advices that what you need is to merge passion and skill with something that people can use. He does, however, warn that not all passions are to be pursued as business because there are passions that people are not willing to pay for.

In the book you’ll find help to outline your business ideas quickly, helping you to solve the challenge of creating the elusive business plan that leaves many stuck. There are also steps to market testing as well as strategies to launching. Guillebeau uses case studies throughout the book; stories of people who quit their jobs and took the leap to start a business that ended up successful, and people who packed their bags to travel the world while making money.

The advice and stories are great but if you’ve already read a number of business or self-help books, this one can sound like a repetition of everything you’ve heard before. The emphasis on combining passion and skill with something people can use is at times dissatisfying and the many case studies are exhausting.

At times, a book has the pure intention of showing the reader all the possibilities out there by focusing on a lot of successful stories but that can make the book stale and create that too-ambitious element. Readers don’t want a book that says, “Sit your butt down, you will fail at this”, but they also don’t want a fairytale-esque self-help because it’s challenging for many people to square that kind of information with their realities.  

I’d recommend it for people with no baggage, no spouse or family to look after. You can’t just up and leave to globe-trot while running a business from your laptop and cafes when you have kids and a spouse with a steady job. Younger people who are still finding themselves and who can afford to make the shittiest mistakes while growing and learning their way to generating income, will probably appreciate it. Also, older people who want to finally do the things they had sacrificed to have a stable family, would appreciate it and take on this kind of journey.   

It can get you going at first but halfway through the book you can easily take a bow, put it down and say, “I get the gist, thank you.” However, the simplicity of how taking the leap and starting, making changes and learning as you go along are some of the gems you’ll walk away with.

⭐⭐

Title: The $100 Startup

Author: Chris Guillebeau

Published: 2012

Genre: Self-help

Money Monday – Lessons from ‘Rich Dad Poor Dad’ by Robert Kiyosaki

“Great opportunities are not seen with your eyes. They are seen with your mind. Most people never get wealthy simply because they are not trained financially to recognize opportunities right in front of them.”

― Robert T. Kiyosaki, Rich Dad, Poor Dad

Not having enough income or no income at all can make becoming wealthy a dream that’s only afforded the elite few. We’ve been taught that only super high income earners and people born into money, can become wealthy. Yes they can get richer, some lose their wealth, but it does not mean that you cannot create your wealth too.

“Rich Dad Poor Dad’ challenges these misleading beliefs about wealth and demonstrates how you can start your way to creating your own riches. He illustrates this with a story about his real father, a teacher who made a good living but struggled to make ends meet, and his friend’s father who had little education but ran multiple businesses. The latter opened up a new world to him by introducing him to financial education outside of school.

Here are the lessons you’ll learn from this book:

Lesson 1: The rich do not work for money but rather it is money that works for them. He explains how greed and fear affect our financial patterns and how they can make us work so hard for so little just for security.

Lesson 2: Teaching financial literacy is of supreme importance and it should start at an early age. It’s not about how much you make but how much you keep (This reminds me of ‘The Richest Man in Babylon’). We have many professionals and highly educated people who are excellent at their jobs but are not so good with personal finances. He stresses that one needs a strong financial foundation and in addition, an education on how to manage money.

Lesson 3: We spend time minding other people’s businesses and less on our own. You could spend a lifetime working for someone, making them money and end up with nothing for yourself. Here he introduces Assets and Liabilities and the importance of acquiring assets, and reducing liabilities and expenses.

Lesson 4: It’s crucial to understand tax and its advantages. Business owners earn, spend and pay taxes, while employees earn, pay taxes and spend what is left. If you want to earn wealth you should make it your business to know as much as you can about your tax legislation.

Lesson 5: Financial IQ allows you to see opportunities where others don’t and to act on them. Wealthy people create their own luck and end up inventing money. Whilst money may seem like the greatest asset you can possess, it’s actually your mind that is your greatest asset.

Lesson 6: He points out how when it comes to money, the only skill that most of us know is to work hard. A lot of people work hard at a secure job and focus on the pay and benefits, which is short-term vision. He suggests learning another skill, one that will help increase your income.

Lesson 7: Robert lists five main reasons financially illiterate people may still not have abundant cash flow: fear, cynicism, laziness, bad habits and arrogance. How these are managed makes a difference between people with wealth and those without.

Lesson 8: How do you start?  Some of the things advises us to do are to find a reason greater than reality. Make a daily choice to be rich, associate yourself with the right people, and be aware of the power of learning quickly. Master your self-discipline and pay yourself first (‘The Richest Man in Babylon).

Lesson 9: Some few more things to do:

  • Take time to assess what’s working and what’s not.
  • Learn from someone who has done it before.
  • READ! Take classes and go to seminars.
  • History has good lessons, learn from there.
  • Take action.

There’s a whole lot more in the book that you can read, the above are merely to show you the kind of knowledge you will gain from it.

Overall, this is an easy book to start on your financial literacy journey. I would recommend that people read it as early in their lives as they can. Give it to a younger person as a gift or someone with little to no financial IQ. You can use it as a tool to gaining financial freedom. I’ve read other books on the same subject and this is one of the easiest to understand.

I hope this helps you on making a financial difference in your life. Enjoy!