Tag Archives: inspiration

Review: Diary of a Young Girl – Anne Frank

“Although I’m only fourteen, I know quite well what I want, I know who is right and who is wrong.”

Hitler’s obsession with having a “pure” race lead to an unspeakable period of barbaric and brutal war against the Jews and other million others targeted for racial, ideological and political reasons. When he became Chancellor in 1933, he did not waste time in starting his anti-Jewish operation.

There was mass transportation to concentration camps where imprisonment, mass gassing, death from starvation and diseases, and other merciless crimes against humanity took place.

The years from 1942 to 1945 were a time when Jews from all over Europe were sent to these concentration camps and it is during these years that Anne Frank put down pen to paper to pour down her account of the time she spent in hiding with her family, another family of three and a friend.

Anne’s diary entries begin in June 1942, on her 13th birthday, about a month before they go into hiding. In July they go into hiding in a building where his father’s office is and here begins their two-year hiding.

Anne records the atmosphere in their dwelling, describing the environment itself, the food, the daily activities that are mostly reading and writing, and the rows that take place among them.

Below them, on the ground floor is a warehouse that is used during the day, and at that time they have to stay as quiet as possible to avoid getting caught. As grim and tragic as their circumstances are, Anne expresses hope and a positive outlook on life.

“I’ve found that there is always some beauty left — in nature, sunshine, freedom, in yourself; these can all help you.”

There are times when she writes about her pain, depression, crying herself to sleep but her writing still bursts with impressive wisdom, maturity, introspection, intelligence and wit.

Her diary shows her depth of feeling, things she doesn’t share with anyone else but feels so strongly about. Her opinions are strong and she has an independent mind, as well as a clear direction that she wishes to take after the war.

“I don’t want to have lived in vain like most people. I want to be useful or bring enjoyment to all people, even those I’ve never met. I want to go on living even after my death!”

There are many things to enjoy about this diary, especially Anne’s belief in freedom, despite the confines she and her family are in where freedom has been taken away from them.

She expresses a belief – freedom for people to live in peace and freedom of self. In the midst of fear of being discovered and taken away, she still shows courage and cheerfulness.

Her thirst for learning is unquenchable. She finds comfort in reading, learning and writing. In the depth of a miserable situation where the future is unpredictable and she has no idea about the other side of the war, she still commits to absorbing knowledge and creating.

“I can shake off everything as I write; my sorrows disappear, my courage is reborn.”

I enjoyed The Diary of a Young Girl because of how it can shift one’s perspective on their own suffering and worries. It’s inspiring and informative in the way that it takes you into her contemplation of the war. It’s also a good read for people who are interested in history and war.

The last diary entry is on 1 August 1944 and shortly after an informer tells on the family. Their place is raided and they’re taken away. Anne died in 1945. Only her father survived and when he returned after the war, he found the diary kept by his office workers. Anne had wanted to become a writer and to publish the diary, and her father published it in her memory.

⭐⭐⭐⭐

A Girl From The South Side – Reading ‘Becoming’ by Michelle Obama

And the Best Spoken Word Album | 2020 GRAMMYs goes to…

A toast to Michelle Obama for her win. We’re adding this celebration to the collage of all the iconic women who are allowing other women and girls of colour to see themselves in places they couldn’t have otherwise imagined.

Since the award is for the audiobook version of her memoir Becoming, I just had to write a review of the book.

In Becoming, the former first lady of the United States takes us through a personal journey – from her childhood in the South Side of Chicago, all the way to the walls of the White House. In between these two points is a young girl in Princeton who experiences what it’s like to be the only black face in a room, there’s the diligent student in Harvard, a high-powered lawyer, a young woman who falls in love, a wife and a mother. The shifting in all these stages make this an aptly titled book where Michelle reveals so much about her life, doing it so with candour and much appreciated humour.

Michelle grew up in a nuclear family of four – her, her parents and brother. We later see how she was raised, the roles her parents played, their approach to life and how she and her brother were treated, shape the person she becomes. Her life as a student shows us a young woman who has a clear idea of who and what she wants to be, an overachiever and “box-checker” who later learns that she has to adjust to life’s circumstances.

When it comes to her love story with former president Barack Obama, and her role as a wife and a mother to her daughters, it’s refreshing to read her honest admission to moments of fear, anxiety, self-doubt and a search for balance between work, family life, Barack’s political career and self.

“If you don’t get out there and define yourself, you’ll be quickly and inaccurately defined by others.”

― Michelle Obama, Becoming

Michelle admits to never being a fan of politics and was not the kind of spouse who immediately ran with her husband’s decision to run for president. As an achieved, successful and strong woman, she had to take on a role that was centred on the career of her spouse. She is also a black woman, which carries more weight than it is a simple description of her ethnicity. She takes us behind the scenes of what it’s like to stare at the ugly face of politics, to have her and her family under public scrutiny and being treated or seen as a public accessory. However, she neither whines nor begs for pity, but rather shows us how she navigated her way through these challenges.

As much of a celebrity as she is, and as prominent and iconic as she is, in Becoming we get to sit down with a normal woman who tells us her story. Simple.

My friend read, loved and wouldn’t shut up about this book until I read it. I also cannot shut up about it and I recommend it for all women, more especially women who have gone through or are going through the journey of BECOMING. Becoming yourself, becoming whatever role it is you’re taking up or have just taken up, becoming with the love of your life, or becoming a mother.

Becoming offers a wealth of inspiration as well as a delightful insight into the life of one of the most admirable figures in the world.

⭐⭐⭐⭐

Enjoy!

Our Favourite Quotes From ‘The Greatness Guide’ by Robin Sharma


– “As you live your days, so you craft your life.”

– “Reading is one of the best disciplines I know of to stay ‘on your game’ and at your highest.”

– “We are all flesh and bones. If they can get to greatness – so can you.”

– “Too many of us are afraid to be ourselves. So we give up our dreams to follow the crowd.”

– “Focus plus daily improvement plus time equals genius.”

– “How fully would you show up each day – at work and in life – if retreat just wasn’t an option?”

– “Try not to teach your fears to your kids. Introduce your children to what’s possible.”

– “Be outrageously energetic and madly alive.”

– “Learning or decaying.”

– “Life is short, and the world is small – but it’s really, really wide.”

Have a fantastic week 👊🏿
And don’t forget to read 📖

‘The Richest Man in Babylon’ Is A Worthy Investment In Your Journey To Financial Prosperity

“Where the determination is, the way can be found.”

― George S. Clason, The Richest Man in Babylon

Title: The Richest Man in Babylon

Author: George S. Clason

The Richest Man in Babylon is a famous classic that gives exemplary financial advice. It uses parables that one can easily adopt and apply. In the book, Arkad is the richest man in Babylon who shares his journey to wealth.

He shares ‘the seven cures for a lean purse’, which are:

  • ‘Start thy purse to fattening.’ This reminds us how there are many trades with which we can use to earn money and how to use that source of wealth that one already has. From what you earn you can start fattening your purse by saving one-tenth of your earnings.
  • ‘Control thy expenditures.’ Budgeting for the necessary expenses will help to put away one-tenth of the money you make.
  • ‘Make thy gold multiply.’ Making money work for you means that a stream of wealth will continue to flow into your purse.
  • ‘Guard thy treasures from loss.’ It’s wise to consult with people who have the knowledge to help with protection from unsafe investments.
  • ‘Make of thy dwelling a profitable investment.’ It highlights the important distinction between renting and buying, and also how you can use your property to establish a business.
  • ‘Insure a future income.’ It’s prudent to provide in advance for your needs as you grow older and for the wellbeing of your family.
  • ‘Increase the ability to earn.’ It is smart to develop your skills and sharpen your investment knowledge to increase your earnings power.

Amongst other parables, the book also shares five laws of gold which Arkad considers to be greater than the gold itself. These detail how gold works, whom it favours and whom it slips away from.

This book is a wise investment when making your way toward building your wealth or increasing it. After reading books like Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki and Tony Robbins’s Money Master the Game: 7 Simple Steps to Financial Freedom, I could already understand where most of their advice comes from and how many wealthy people practise the same financial habits that are in Clason’s book.

It will teach you a lot about how a great desire for wealth can be a good place to start, even when you don’t have much else to begin with. It will also emphasize why you should take advantage of opportunities available to everyone. You will learn how luck favours those who act and those who grab opportunities.

The Richest Man in Babylon is short and featherweight and despite some of its language being rather archaic, it’s still heavily loaded with beneficial advice. Its size and ease also help when you want to go back to its pages for a reminder, to find something that you previously missed or simply to clarify something along your journey to wealth.